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are sort of the first step to the government coming into your house and trying to take away your guns. so that, i think, has been the, you know, the strength of their appeal. much more so than dollars and cents. they're part of the culture in parts of the country. >> we put that poll up, and we saw support for some level of gun control go up after newtown. now it seems to be slipping back a little bit more. i think karen has a great point, rana. it really is that slippery slope argument. >> it is. listen, i grew up in rural indiana. i understand parts of the country have different attitudes about guns. again, i think we've really gotten a twisted view of what the american norm is. if you go back to the 19th century or the earlier part of the 20th century, gun control laws were much stricter, even in free-wheeling -- or places perceived as being free wheeling like texas, colorado, western states. i think that our sense of normal has just moved so far away from what a middle point is that we need to get back there. >> rana, karen, thanks to both of you. >> thank you. >> thank you. >>> also
it was with the potential for a government shutdown, which has now been averted. so again, back to this new pace rhine of these big debates over real issues that are kind of going nowhere. and a new baseline that incidentally it's interesting because their stopgap spending bill that was passed yesterday did mark something of a breakthrough in that the appropriators in the house and the senate, the bipartisan leaderships thereof were able to come together and come up with a spending plan that keeps the government solvent and keeps it operating. and so i think that now we are going to see the appropriators get, you know, being able to get together hopefully and work out these, you know, technocratic stopgap spending bills while the battle wages in the background without any hope of actual consensus. >> good to see both of you. have a good weekend. we are hearing this morning from the commander of the marine base in kwaunt coe, virginia where three were killed. ask as we take care of our marines and their families that are dealing with this tragedy, i'd also ask for the support of our neighbors, the comm
we as a party, if we want to grow and we want to win and govern again, at the presidential level, we've got to look at times and said, hey, you may not agree eye us on every single issue that the party has put out there, but we're willing to include you in the party as long as you understand. >> doesn't this conflict with some of the messaging we've heard from cpac over the weekend, though? >> there are personal some speakers at cpac who don't believe otherwise. i would argue while cpac does represent a good amount of people that believe in the republican party. cpac is not the republican party and the republican party is not cpac. so i appreciate all the work they do out there. but that's one part of the party. i's a great part of the party. but, you know, we're not synonymous. >> and as the first word of the report says, the gop is a tale of two parties. we'll see how that goes. sean spicer, thank you very much. >> thank you. >> let's bring back lynn as well as jackie. first you, lynn, what's your thought in the way sean spicer described what this meant and where the party needs to
you from getting your big gulp drinks, trying to cast bloomberg as the villain, big government guy in your face. that said, on background checks and gun control, something like 90% of americans support extended background checks. he is not in the minority but in the strong majority. his money can reinforce that message. they vote on their personal beliefs and policies in their state. we are talking $12 million in 13 states, that's not that much money, sounds like a lot. one million per state won't decide how a senator votes. they decide based on what people in their state thinks. even gun owners are for expanded background checks. >> want to bring in congressman dave cyst lean ee, democrat from rhode island. what do you think, is perry right or can $12 million and the voice that michael bloomberg has, the attention he is able to get say going on "meet the press" change the conversation? >> i think perry is right, this is where the american people already are. what these ads do, activate those in those states to reach out to their member of the congress or senate and urge them to ad
. the president encouraged their leaders to move toward peace. >> now is the time for the iranian government to take immediate and meaningful steps to reduce tensions and work toward an enduring, long-term settlement of the nuclear issue. >> i want to bring in matt welch editor-in-chief of "reason" magazine and mckay copins. good to see both of you. >> thank you so much. the white house managing expectations, matt. what do they want out of this trip? >> i think what obama is trying to do besides serially lower expectations is talk directly to the people of israel and the palestinian authority themselves. he is going to give a talk to an informal talk at a youth center in the west bank and a talk to israeli students. he thinks if he moves around the political structure he might lay the groundwork for something that might come later and try to change hearts and minds. >> there was an interesting poll that just came out. it was a daily newspaper there. they found 38% believe he is hostile to israel. 14% think he is indifferent. only one-third believe that he is supportive. i wonder what you thi
program. you also have the great cooperation between our two governments on the iron dome, missile defense system which is no longer theory, we've seen it work and save lives and reduce the risk to people in israel. so i think it's more important what they do together than whether or not they have a personal relationship. frankly, i think some of the reporting on this is a little bit inaccurate. but that's of less significance. >> you mean in terms of their personal relationship? >> yeah, i think it's blown out of kind of -- sometimes the journalism in this takes the form of some psychology analysis. i really don't think that's the key thing. what we do together and i think that's what they'll be discussing and i'm sure they'll be able to have a good discussion. and this is a critically important time because of the threat posed by iran's nuclear program. we've got to stop that. we've made a very clear determination now that -- and i mean we meaning the congress and the administration that containment is not good enough that we've got to make sure we prevent nuclear weapons capability, ope
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6